Infrequently Noted

Alex Russell on browsers, standards, and the process of progress.

back!

We got back from Japan on Tuesday and have been jet-lagged ever since. I observed to a co-worker the other day that getting used to the time in Japan wasn't that hard since I could sleep in and do stuff whenever I wanted since I was, um, on vacation.

I've continued my radio-silence until now since I've been reburied under the mountain of stuff I left unfinished when I ran away for vacation. I've promised about 100 people pictures online at some point, but as I feel compelled to write captions for most of them, who knows when they will actually be up.

In other news, Dave Schontzler (of stilleye fame) has started work at Informatica for the summer as an intern in my group. Needless to say, I'm psyched. This summer looks to be getting under way very well indeed.

crickets

This site is about to go radio-silent for a couple of weeks. I'm going to Japan for 3 weeks if all goes well this week. I'll be back by the beginning of next month, but until then, enjoy the sweet sounds of crickets chirping.

new camera

People who have known me very well for the past 3 years or so can attest to the fact that I've been drooling over the concept (if not the execution) of a digital camera. Last weekend Jennifer was incredibly patient whilst I paced up and down the isles of cameras at Frys and turned my options over in my hands and tried to get a "feel" for one that I liked.

Until recently, I've been wedded to the concept of a nice SLR-body digital camera, but with the impending trip to Japan, I decided that portability had a higher priority than having the most control or the highest density sensor with the best optics. I picked up a Casio EX-P600 and a half-gig SD card. The initial results are encouraging, and it's faaaast. In "bestshot" mode, you can select from setup profiles for different conditions and subjects, and even save your own profiles.

Here's a picture (warning: 3meg) I took this morning at work. I certainly don't have any eye for this stuff yet, but at least the camera makes my meager attempts look pretty good.

a9 and JS

a9 is yet more evidence that the rules of web interface construction are changing. Based on 36K of JavaScript, the interface is fluid and uses DHTML to effect reload-less state keeping. In essence, the client side does what clients should do: maintain their own damn state. Informing the server for the purpose of keeping preferences intact is one thing, but allowing the client side to handle it on it's own is clearly preferred. The cookie and iframe approach that a9 is using get much, much closer the user expectation mark.

Horray for the user winning.

Where did all the good DHTML geeks go?

I thought San Francisco was supposed to be the place where you could get a good unemployed web geek in any coffee shop...so where'd everyone go?

I know of at least 2 companies that need a top-notch HTML/DHTML geeks in the bay area stat. Send me resumes and I'll see that they get into the right hands. If you've got a URL or an example of work, so much the better.

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